Tag Archives: Solutions Insights

Webinar: The “Other” Solution Launch: Preparing Sales to Sell A New Solution

Webinar Proceedings Now Available:
Video:

Topic: The “Other” Solution Launch: Preparing Sales to Sell A New Solution
By: Matt Leary, Solutions Insights and Dr. Peter Martin, Invensys

Date: Thursday, Januray 31, 2013
Time: 12:00 pm, Eastern Standard Time (New York)
Register Today

Many marketing departments have elaborate plans and fine-tuned processes to introduce a new solution to the marketplace. But they often neglect an equally-important activity that requires the same level of strategy, preparation and follow-up: the launch a new solution to partners and direct sales. In this webinar, Matt Leary, Principal with Solutions Insights, will discuss the steps and governing principles critical for enabling partners and direct sales to successfully sell a new solution. He will be joined by Peter Martin, Ph.D., Vice President and Invensys Fellow at Invensys Operations Management, who will present real-world examples of activities and lessons learned when his company launched a new solution to a product-focused sales team.

Solutions Insights, Inc. (SI) is a consulting and training company that helps B2B firms develop, market and sell solutions that provide tangible business value to customers through the integration of products, services and intellectual capital. SI’s client list includes leading firms in IT, telecom, industrial automation, manufacturing and professional services. For more information: www.solutionsinsights.com <http://www.solutionsinsights.com> .
MattLeary-SolutionsInsightsMatt Leary, Principal
An expert in solutions development, management, and sales, Matt has spent the last 15 years helping leading technology companies improve performance in market strategy and planning, services and solutions development, sales enablement and impact.Prior to Solutions Insight, Matt was Vice President of Business Development for commercial partnership activities at a Boston-area technology start-up. Previously, he was Director of Member Engagement at ITSMA, where he managed several of ITSMA’s industry segments and developed custom research, consulting, and training programs for a wide variety of leading technology firms.Before joining ITSMA in 2000, Matt helped create and manage the custom marketing programs group for Horizon House Publications, publisher of Telecommunications Magazine. He began his technology marketing and sales management career directing the activities of a niche outbound call center. Matt holds a Bachelor’s degree in Anthropology from the University of Chicago. He is currently a Senior Associate at ITSMA.

Peter MartinPeter Martin, Ph.D.

Peter Martin, Ph.D, Vice President and Invensys Fellow at Invensys Operations Management in Foxboro, Massachusetts. Dr. Martin joined The Foxboro Company in the 1970s and has worked in a variety of positions in training, engineering, product planning, and marketing and strategic planning. He left Foxboro to become Vice President at Intech Controls and also at Automation Research Corporation before returning to Invensys in 1996. Since his return he has been VP of Marketing for Foxboro and Chief Marketing Officer for Invensys Manufacturing and Process Systems prior to moving into his current position.

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Pre-Summit Workshop Building Powerful Sales Playbooks

This topic will be presented as a Pre-Summit workshop on Wednesday, August 15 by Matt Leary, who will leverage both industry research and best practice examples to help participants learn to create and roll out targeted and winning sales playbo

oks.

Leading technology and engineering firms invest heavily in developing solutions that meet market needs, but often short-change the equally important steps of determining the best customers for their solutions and then building the right tools to help their sales team sell them. In this workshop, participants will learn how to choose the best sales-ready plays and how to create and deploy one of the most powerful solutions selling tools: The Sales Playbook.

Workshop topics include:
· Choosing the Right Plays: Understanding customer needs and identifying solutions-driven plays that will gain traction with both customers and sales
· Creating Powerful Playbooks: Building playbooks with the right content and direction to support field and channel sales teams
· Enabling and Measuring Play Success: Building the right marketing assets, sales enablement tools and training programs to make the plays successful

About Matt Leary
An expert in solutions development, management, and sales, Matt has spent the last 15 years helping leading technology companies improve performance in market strategy and planning, services and solutions development, sales enablement and impact.

Prior to Solutions Insight, Matt was Vice President of Business Development for commercial partnership activities at a Boston-area technology start-up. Previously, he was Director of Member Engagement at ITSMA, where he managed several of ITSMA’s industry segments and developed custom research, consulting, and training programs for a wide variety of leading technology firms.

Before joining ITSMA in 2000, Matt helped create and manage the custom marketing programs group for Horizon House Publications, publisher of Telecommunications Magazine. He began his technology marketing and sales management career directing the activities of a niche outbound call center. Matt holds a Bachelor’s degree in Anthropology from the University of Chicago. He is currently a Senior Associate at ITSMA.

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The Continuing Rise of Account-Based Marketing: 4 Keys to Success

This post authored by Rob Leavitt online pharmacy cialis

se-of-account-based-marketing-four-keys-to.html”>originally appeared on the Solutions Insights Blog.

Over the last 10 years, more and more B2B firms have invested in account-based marketing: treating individual accounts as “markets” and devising focused campaigns just for them.

Back when my partners and I were developing some of the early methodology for account-based marketing in the early 2000s at ITSMA, it was a tough sell. We had seen strong results from ABM pioneers, such as Accenture, IBM, Xerox, and HP, but the costs of doing ABM were clearer to many marketers than the benefits. It is, after all, a pretty labor-intensive approach, and it requires a lot of negotiating with sales and account teams. Much easier to just spam the market with generic emails, webinars, brochures, and the like.

As marketers began to appreciate the value of more focused approaches, however, such as vertical industry marketing, as well as the critical importance of their top accounts, ABM began to take hold. By 2005-2007, many of the top B2B tech and IT service firms were experimenting with ABM. We were going great guns at ITSMA with research, workshops, an ABM Council, annual ABM awards, and, of course, direct consulting and training to help companies get started and succeed.

What many marketers realized was that developing highly targeted programs for individual accounts yielded a great many benefits, both externally and internally. Externally, ABM can generate substantial improvements in customer relationships, brand perception, solutions proof points, revenue, and profitability. Internally, ABM can help prove the value of marketing, improve relationships with Sales, and strengthen focus on core customer challenges and potential solutions.

New research from Alterra Group suggests that ABM has also gained traction in professional services. According to a recent survey, some 86% of consulting and other professional services firms are now using some form account-based marketing, and looking to further increase spending on ABM in the years ahead. Large majorities of survey respondents further suggest that ABM has a higher ROI than other marketing approaches, and provides significant benefits in terms of retaining clients, increasing revenue and profit, and attracting new clients.

Not surprisingly, the research also found that companies investing more in ABM and paying more attention to program metrics are achieving greater results. (One would certainly hope so!)

I know we’re all focused heavily on figuring out how to “socialize” everything in marketing these days (with good reason) and, especially as the 4th quarter looms, on doing whatever we can to help close sales before the end of the year. If you’ve let your ABM efforts lag, however, or not yet begun to invest in the approach, the Alterra Group research should be yet another set of data points convincing you to keep ABM front and center.

From our own experience, I’d like to suggest four critical success factors that go beyond simply spending more money and measuring results:

  • Deep Research: Companies starting out in ABM often skip the hard work of preparation in favor of jumping right into outbound tactics, such as special events, collateral, and briefings. The real power of ABM comes from digging deep into an individual client’s business situation, strategy, options, and operating environment as a precursor to really thinking through how you can help. Don’t skip this step!
  • Client Collaboration: The best ABM programs are not only transparent to the client (i.e., you don’t hide the fact that you’re making a special effort) but developed directly with the client. Actively involving client executives in research, brainstorming, thought leadership, relationship building, and solutions development is a huge win-win. The client knows you’re serious about investing real time and resources in understanding their needs and crafting customized solutions. You get the tremendous benefit of the client’s insight, brainpower, and feedback to help keep you on track and develop solutions you might never have even considered.
  • Sustained Focus: ABM oriented to specific bids or quarterly results may be effective, but its greater potential comes in transforming the entire relationship with the client. Accenture, one of the first ITSMA award winners for ABM, turned a lot of heads in presenting its two-year ABM plans for top clients, but had transformative results to show for it. Thinking and planning longer term enables more ambitious strategies and much more substantial results.
  • Solutions Orientation: I’ve mentioned the “S” word a few times already. One of the big differences between ABM and traditional account planning is that the latter typically focuses on selling more of whatever is on the shelf and doing it as fast as possible. Don’t get me wrong; good account planning is incredibly important. But stepping back to do the deep research, collaborate with clients, and think about a longer term transformation of the relationship literally mandates that you also step back from current inventory, put yourself in the client’s situation, and think anew about what really is going to make a major difference for them.

Is ABM here to stay? Let’s hope so; it’s one of the most effective approaches we have in B2B marketing. Making sure we do it the right way, however, is the real test, and shortcuts are not likely to show such great results.

What do you think? Are you implementing ABM? What’s working for you?

Photo credit: hapticflapjack

Solutions Insights is a sponsor for the 6th Annual ISA Marketing & Sales Summit.

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